The Council of Nordic Trade Unions (NFS) has nominated Katja Lehto-Komulainen, the Head of International Affairs at the Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (SAK), as its candidate for election to the position of Deputy General Secretary of the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC).

“I am honoured that an organisation representing almost nine million employees in the Nordic countries has proposed me as its candidate, and I now hope to have an opportunity to work for the benefit of all employees in Europe,” Lehto-Komulainen says.
 
The ETUC Executive Committee will appoint the new Deputy General Secretary at its meeting on 14 December to fill a vacancy left by the present post holder Veronica Nilsson from Sweden, following her decision to step down for family reasons during the Congress period.

Long experience and excellent language skills

Katja Lehto-Komulainen is currently responsible for the international operations of SAK, for example assisting the SAK President at meetings of the ETUC Executive Committee.

Lehto-Komulainen has worked at SAK in various capacities since 1997, including a period of job release while serving as Special Advisor to Minister of Labour Tarja Filatov. Lehto-Komulainen originally joined SAK after working in various capacities at the Finnish Ministry of Labour and as an civil servant trainee in the cabinet of Finland’s first European Commissioner Erkki Liikanen.
 
Besides the ETUC and NFS, she is actively involved in working with the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), and the Baltic Sea Trade Union Network (BASTUN).
 
Lehto-Komulainen was the Workers’ Delegate of Finland at the International Labour Conference during several sessions.

Besides her legal training, Katja Lehto-Komulainen is an excellent communicator, speaking French, English, Russian and Scandinavian languages.
 
CV for Katja Lehto-Komulainen in English, German, French and Spanish.

Correction on 7 November 2016 at 11:20: NFS represents almost nine million employees, not eight million.